Exploring Seville, Spain – Part 3

Beyond the old quarter of Seville, there is a lot to explore in this great city. A major event occurred in Seville in 1929 which altered the city’s legacy and architecture and still adds interest and beauty nearly 100 years later. The event was the Ibero-American Exposition, a year-long world’s fair focusing on the ties between the Iberian peninsula and the Americas which left many landmarks in Seville. In addition, there are other interesting sections of the city that are a bit off the tourist path.

Plaza de España

One of the most beautiful parts of Seville, this Plaza is just a short distance south of the Gothic Cathedral and is part of the massive Maria Luisa Park. Built for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929 to showcase Spain’s industrial and technology exhibits, the half-circle plaza, adjacent building, ponds, fountains and tile works extending around the entire plaza are quite stunning.

A view of the Plaza de España which is a huge half-circle. In this building numerous documents and artifacts relating to Columbus’ voyages were on display during the Exhibition. Today, various government offices and university programs occupy most of the building.
The beautiful tile work extends around the perimeter railings of the Plaza.
All along the Plaza are alcoves representing the regions of Spain with their unique characteristics and historical events expressed in colorful tile.
Another example of one of the alcoves at the Plaza de España.
Many of the countries participating in the Ibero-American Exhibition of 1929 built fabulous pavilions along the Guadalquivir River, some of which serve as embassies today.

Other Views of Seville

We took a “hop on, hop off” bus tour of Seville one afternoon and we were glad we did, this allowed us to get a glimpse of the city beyond the main tourist areas we’ve shared in previous posts. The tour had several different routes and a nighttime tour (at no additional cost) available as well.

The 17th century San Telmo Palace, formerly a university for navigators (Universidad de Mareantes), it also served as a royal residence and is now home to the regional government. It is adjacent to the Maria Luisa Park (which were considered the gardens of the palace).

After a great time in Seville, we next headed further south into the hill towns of Andalucia. Posts on our visit to this area will be coming shortly.

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