Author: Paul Terry

I love to travel. I've been fortunate to visit about 75 countries so far. I prefer to travel independently to get off the beaten path a bit. I also try to find good deals to make my travels more affordable.

Pont-Saint-Martin, Aosta Valley, Italy

The Magical Valle d’Aosta (Aosta Valley)

In the northwest corner of Italy (north of Turin) lies a magical region that receives few tourists. The natural beauty of the Aosta Valley along its historical treasures makes it one of my (many) favorite spots in Italy.

Pont-Saint-Martin, Aosta Valley, Italy

A view of the Aosta Valley from Pont-Saint-Martin, near the southern end of the Valley.

The snow-capped mountains, rushing rivers, numerous waterfalls, castles and ancient Roman ruins all combine to make the Aosta Valley magical. The Valley leads north to the St. Bernard Pass and into Switzerland, an ancient route through the Alps that has been used since Roman times as a trade route and for invading forces (including Napoleon) to conquer the Italian peninsula. (Going west leads to Mount Blanc and into France).

Roman road, Aosta Valley, Italy

First century CE Roman road and tunnel in the Aosta Valley. Ruts from chariots in the road are still visible.

Roman road, Aosta Valley, Italy

Stairway leading up to the Roman road, with a carved column on the opposite rock wall.

Pont-Saint-Martin, Aosta Valley, Italy

Another relic of ancient Roman times, Pont-Saint-Martin, gives the town its name.

Verrès, Aosta Valley, Italy

The town of Verrès, a beautiful small town that has a castle overlooking the town and valley.

Verrès Castle, Aosta Valley, Italy

Verrès Castle, a 14th century castle open to the public, sits on a rock outcropping above the town of Verrès (note the slate roofs on the right). Unfortunately I lost my camera here with its pictures of the castle’s interior! Luckily all my other pictures of Italy were backed up on a computer.

Because the Valley was such a popular thoroughfare for centuries, medieval lords built numerous castles in the Valley to protect their domains from invaders. Some of these castles are open for visitors while others are inaccessible due to their locations. As you drive through the Valley you’ll see castles on the surrounding hillsides.

Aosta Valley, Italy

There are castle ruins almost at every turn, overlooking the Aosta Valley.

Saint-Pierre Castle, Aosta Valley, Italy

Saint-Pierre Castle, near the northern end of the Valley. It is currently not open to the public.

Aosta Valley, Italy

Another old castle (I don’t know its name) in the Aosta Valley. There are about 70 castles surviving in the Valley, some of which are open to the public.

Sarre Royal Castle, Aosta Valley, Italy

Another view of Aosta Valley with Sarre Royal Castle (18th century) on the left.

La Bicoque hotel, Aosta, Italy

We stayed at a little boutique hotel, La Bicoque, just north of the town of Aosta. Not a bad setting for our continental breakfast!

More to come on this magical area. I will write separate posts on the town of Aosta, Bard Fortress, Fènis Castle and Savoia Castle. Stay tuned!

Laupahoehoe Point Beach Park, Hawaii

Visiting the Big Island of Hawai’i

I’ve had the privilege of visiting the islands that make up the state of Hawai’i a few times: twice to Oahu, once each to Maui and Kauai and most recently the Big Island of Hawai’i. All of the islands have their charms, but the Big Island is the most unique island in many ways. It felt more laid back, quiet and rural with fewer tourists and big resorts.

The island of Hawai’i is not only big (bigger than the rest of the Hawaiian Islands combined), but has some amazing diversity in its climate zones – from a dry and very (volcanic) rocky western shore, to the more tropical eastern side, with active volcanoes in the middle and southern central parts of the island and farm and ranch lands in the north central part of the island. The Big Island is also far less touristy than Oahu and Maui and receives about the same number of tourists as Kauai.

Below are a few sights around the island starting on the western side and working our way north and south along the west coast and then east over to Hilo and further south to Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park.

Waikoloa Village – West Coast

This trip was sponsored in part by Hilton Grand Vacations. On a snowy day in Colorado after booking a business trip, I was susceptible to one of those calls telling me that I could experience a vacation package on the Big Island for almost nothing, with the caveat that we listen to a presentation on the wonders of purchasing a share of an available property. To Hilton’s credit, the actual sales pitch was very low key and within an hour or we were on our way again (resort living is just not our type of vacation thing–it took us a while to convince them of this).

You could easily land at the Kona airport, head north 20 minutes to Waikoloa Village resort, and have a full, relaxing (and expensive) vacation never leaving the Village–eating, golfing and swimming all day every day. While all of this was tempting (and fun), we wanted to see more of the island, since we knew it was unlikely we would be back.

Waikoloa Village, Hawaii.

We stayed at the Waikoloa Village Resort, a Hilton property on the northwest coast of Hawaii. The resort has hotel rooms and condo properties. It’s about 20 minutes north of the Kona Airport.

Waikoloa Village Resort, Hawaii

The Waikoloa Village is of course beautiful, set right along the rugged volcanic coast with many amenities.

Waikoloa Resort, Hawaii

The Waikoloa Resort is so big that you take a tram or water taxi to your room from the main entrance.

Kohala Coast, Hawaii

This photo was taken just south of the Waikoloa Resort, along the Kohala Coast. Much of the island is volcanic rock meaning white sand beaches are few and far between. Since the coast is not heavily developed, many spots can be found for a quiet picnic.

Waikoloa King’s Trail

Near the Waikoloa Village is the ancient King’s Trail. This trail was used by Hawaiians from about 1400 – 1800 CE as a transportation route along the coast. You can walk along parts of the trail, with signs to guide your way and explain the historical features.

Waikoloa Kings Trail, Hawaii

The Waikoloa Kings Trail winds its way through the pretty barren volcanic landscape.

King's Trail, Hawaii

Along the King’s Trail. Overhanging cliffs like those shown here provided protected overnight camping spots for the ancient Hawaiians. In the near lower left foreground petroglyphs can be seen on the rock.

King's Trail, Hawaii

Examples of other petroglyphs along the King’s Trail.

From Waikoloa Village, we explored north and then south along the west coast.

North/West Coast of Hawai’i (North Kohala)

Like much of the Big Island, this part of Hawai’i is quiet and felt pretty remote, with just a few tiny towns and lots of open hilly countryside. It was apparent that the northern tip of the island receives more moisture than most of the western side.

Hapuna Beach State Park, Hawaii

Hapuna Beach State Park, a short way north of Waikoloa Village. Hey, an actual sandy beach!

King Kamehameha, Hawaii

This is the original statue of King Kamehameha, commissioned and cast in 1878. The King’s birthplace is near here. He united the Hawaiian Islands in the 18th century. This statue is found in the little village of Kapa’au, at the northern end of the Big Island.

Kapa'au, Hawaii

The little village of Kapa’au in North Kohala, a town that doesn’t feel like it’s changed much over the years.

Continuing a little further along the northern coast of the Big Island from Kapa’au, is Pololu Valley Lookout. Given the rugged terrain, you have to back track through Kapa’au to continue going south and east around the island.

Pololu Valley Lookout, Hawaii

This is a view of Pololu Valley Lookout, just east of the town of Kapa’au. There is a steep hike down to the black sand beach, it took us about 30 minutes to reach the shore.

Going a little further east along the northern end of the Big Island from Kapa’au, is the village of Honoka’a and Waipi’o Lookout.

Honoka'a, Hawaii

Downtown Honoka’a, the People’s Theater from 1930, a place that feels like old town Americana. With 525 seats, this theater presents films, concerts, dance recitals and classes.

Waipi'o Valley Lookout, Hawaii

This is the Waipi’o Valley Lookout, near Honoka’a. The island has lots of deserted beaches, due to their limited accessibility.

South/West Coast

This section of the island is drier and is the “urban” center of the island, with most of the shopping and restaurants along this part of the coast, south of Kona airport.

Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

A view of Kailua-Kona area, the main center for services and shopping on the Big Island’s west coast. There isn’t much of a “downtown”, just a series of small shopping centers and neighborhoods stretching for miles along the coast.

Honaunau – Saint Benedict’s Painted Church

As you continue south for Kailua-Kona area, you come across some other interesting sights.

Saint Benedict's Painted Church, Honaunau, Hawaii.

We visited this little church in the town of Honaunau, south of Kailua-Kona, known as Saint Benedict’s Painted Church.

Saint Benedict's Painted Church, Honaunau, Hawaii

The interior of Saint Benedict’s was painted right around the end of the 19th century. A Belgian priest used the biblical scenes to teach the natives who could not read. The interior reminded me a bit of the Scandinavian painted churches we have seen during our other travels.

Pu’uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Park

Don’t ask me to pronounce the name of this Park, but this is an interesting sight right on the coast and a very sacred spot to Hawaiian natives. It was where Hawaiian royalty lived and it now serves as a historical educational park. This park is just due west from the Painted Church above.

Pu'uhonua O Honaunau National Historic Site, Hawaii

The setting of Pu’uhonua O Honaunau National Historic Site is quite beautiful–the royals knew how to pick a good location!

You get a map with your entrance fee, and walk from point to point to learn more about ancient Hawaiian customs, skilled craftsmanship and way of life.

Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Site, Hawaii

In the shadows at dusk are examples of native carvings near the entrance to Pu’uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Site.

Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historic Site, Hawaii

An ancient ceremonial structure in Pu’uhonua O Honaunau National Historic Site.

Pu'uhonua O Honaunau National Historic Site. Hawaii

Example of an outrigger canoe, showing construction from traditional materials.

North/East Coast (Hamakua Coast) of the Big Island

After exploring north and south along the west coast, we crossed over to the east coast of the Big Island through Waimea, a ranching area that reminded me a bit of Colorado.

Waimea

The countryside of Waimea, this scene looks like it could be in Colorado or Wyoming or New Mexico!

There are not many driving routes across the island, and this route is the main one. As you reach the east coast, the climate zone shifts to a more tropical feel, clearly this side of this island receives more moisture than the west coast. The northeast coast of the Big Island, known as Hamakua, is rugged and the surf is rougher than on the western side. It has a wild beauty, with the dark volcanic rock contrasting with the dark green vegetation. While there are numerous state parks on this side of the island, you won’t find a lot of soft sandy beaches.

Here are a few State Parks heading south along the east coast towards Hilo:

Laupahoehoe Point Beach Park, Hawaii

Laupahoehoe Point Beach Park

Kolekole Beach Park, Hawaii

Kolekole Beach Park

Onomea Bay, Hawaii

Onomea Bay, a protected cove on a rugged shoreline.

Just a few miles inland from Onomea Bay is another state park, Akaka Falls.

Akaka Falls State Park, Hawaii

Akaka Falls is just inland from Onomea Bay, and a short hike takes you to a view of the falls.

Akaka Falls, Hawaii

A view of Akaka Falls.

Hilo

Just few miles south of the locations above brings you to Hilo. I had expected Hilo to have  a bigger city feel and tourist vibe, but it felt very “local” and is relatively small town. It became apparent to me that most tourists hang out on the west coast, rather than Hilo. Hilo also has an airport, which makes sense given the size of the island and the fact that two 13,000 ft volcanoes (Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa) separate the east and west coasts, making travel across the island slow.

While I don’t have a photo, be sure to stop at Ken’s House of Pancakes in Hilo any time of day for delicious pancakes and about everything else! We enjoyed our meal there.

Hilo, Hawaii.

Downtown Hilo maintains its early 20th century look, I felt like I had stepped back in time to what this town must have looked like during World War II, during my Dad’s time in the islands.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Our last stop on the Big Island was Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, south and west of Hilo in the southeastern part of the island. This is a big park, one could easily spend several days exploring the various features, hiking trails and sights. Volcanic activity on the Big Island is seemingly constant, so parts of the Park may be closed at any given time. Due to the dangerous gases, you are not allowed close to any active craters.

Kilauea Iki Crater, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

The Kilauea Iki Crater, the lava flows here are from 1959.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii

The entrance to Thurston Lava Tube, close to the Kilauea Iki Crater.

Volcanoes National Park17

Inside the Thurston Lava Tube.

Volcanoes National Park2

Steam vents in the National Park, everywhere you go there are reminders that you’re standing on active volcanic soil.

Volcanoes National Park1

The sulphur banks near Kilauea Caldera, wow, you could smell the sulphur!

Kilauea Caldera, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii

The huge Kilauea Caldera, this is about as close as you can get right now. There are trails in the Caldera, but they were closed due to volcanic activity during our stay.

If you enjoy exploring, try the Big Island of Hawai’i and remember there’s more to do than just hit the beach, pool or golf course!

 

Portovenere – An Unexpected Bonus near the Cinque Terre

After a sunny picture-perfect first day, the weather turned a bit stormy during our 2nd day in the Cinque Terre. Since it wasn’t a good beach day, we decided we would visit the other Cinque Terre towns. Luckily, the weather was not so bad that the boat couldn’t run its route. As I mentioned in my previous post on the Cinque Terre, the small ferry boat is a great way to see four of the five Cinque Terre towns, and it includes a wonderful ‘bonus’ stop at the southern end of the route.

We purchased our tickets, got a copy of the schedule for timing our stops and hopped on the boat in Monterosso. We decided to go all the way to the end of the route first and work our way back, stopping in the towns we hadn’t visited yet on the return trip. The woman who sold us the tickets explained the ferry’s route and told us that Portovenere (the last stop) was quite a beautiful town, even though it’s not officially part of the Cinque Terre. She wasn’t joking. Portovenere (also spelled Porto Venere) became one of my favorite spots in this part of Italy. (You can also hike to Portovenere from Riomaggiore, the nearest Cinque Terre town, in about 2 hours).

The travel writer Rick Steves calls Portovenere “enchanting” and I would say that’s an accurate description. I was stunned with our first view of Porto Venere, an old medieval church perched on a rocky outcropping guarding the harbor entrance.

Church of Saint Peter, Porto Venere, Italy

Arriving by sea from the Cinque Terre, the 13th century Church of Saint Peter (La Chiesa di San Pietro) is your first sight.

As we cruised further into the harbor, I could also see remnants of a castle fortress on the hill behind the town and an old wall with towers extending down the hill to the harbor. We hopped off the boat and wandered the town for a couple hours, which gave us time to visit the Church of Saint Peter, Castle Doria and explore a few of the old town streets.

Porto Venere, Italy

A view of Portovenere from the inner harbor.

Portovenere was purchased by the city-state of Genoa in 1116, which ruled this part of the Italian peninsula and was a rival of Pisa [which is about 92 km (57 miles) further south with its famous Leaning Tower], and other Italian states at the time.

Church of Saint Peter, Porto Venere, Italy

Walking up the rocking outcropping to the Church of Saint Peter.

Cinque Terre Porto Venere18

Interior of the Church of Saint Peter, which is actually two churches – the older part dates from the 9th century and the “newer” church (above) is 13th century, from the Genoese era.

Castle Doria, Porto Venere, Italy

A view of the rugged coastline, cliffs and Castle Doria, taken near the Church of Saint Peter.

Castle Doria, Porto Venere, Italy

Taking the stairs up into Castle Doria. There is not too much of the castle itself remaining, but the views of the surrounding area from the grounds are remarkable.

Castle Doria, Porto Venere, Italy

A view of the castle grounds with the Church of Saint Peter in the distance. The castle was rebuilt in the 16th century as a coastal fortress.

Church of Saint Peter, Porto Venere, Italy

I love this view of the Church of Saint Peter with an old castle window in the foreground.

Porto Venere, Italy

Looking down on Portovenere’s harbor and the walls extending from the Castle, with the old town directly below.

After enjoying the great views from the castle grounds, we meandered through the old town on our way back down to the harbor. The Genoese left their mark on the town, including two churches from the 13th and 12th centuries, San Pietro (Saint Peter) and San Lorenzo.

Church of San Lorenzo, Porto Venere, Italy

The 12th century Church of San Lorenzo, another Genoese contribution to Portovenere. Over the main doorway (a little hard to see) is a sculpture of the martyrdom of San Lorenzo who was roasted alive on a grill. Yikes.

Porto Venere, Italy

A view of a residential area near the Church of San Lorenzo.

Porto Venere, Italy

A focacceria with some yummy pastries and pizza and a window covering made out pasta! I wonder how the pasta holds up in a heavy rain?

Porto Venere, Italy

A light rain doesn’t deter tourists and shoppers in the old streets of Portovenere.

Porto Venere, Italy

A typical street scene in old town Portovenere, looking toward the medieval gate.

Porto Venere, Italy

Just outside the walled portion of Portovenere.

Porto Venere, Italy

I always love exploring new places and Portovenere didn’t disappoint. If you get to Cinque Terre, be sure to visit this great town too!

 

Some Tips for Visiting Cinque Terre

Let’s state the obvious…the word on Cinque Terre is out. Many years ago this little corner of Italy would have been a unique find – five colorful quaint villages hugging the coast overlooking the clear turquoise waters of the Ligurian Sea, all connected by hiking trails. While all of the above still holds true, just be prepared to share this “secret” with thousands of your closest friends. We were there in May and it was pretty busy. I cannot imagine what it would be like in July and August, when many Europeans take their holidays. Since the towns are small, there are not many hotel or B&B rooms available (and there’s really no place to build more) and hence why the rates are rising and more people are visiting Cinque Terre as a day trip from either the north (Levanto) or the south (La Spezia). We’ll share a few tips for your visit in this post.

What to Do

Because the towns are small, the main attraction are the towns themselves. Things to do in each are similar: exploring the little streets and alleyways, the town squares and shops, people watching (you will find tourists from all over the world), taking a peek in a few old churches or other buildings, sunbathing, eating wonderful food and gelato, and of course enjoying the local (white) wines. This area has been a wine producing region since Roman times.

Cinque Terre Manarola19

All kinds of interesting pastas were available at a shop in Manarola.

Here is a little bit about each of the five towns, from north to south.

Monterosso al Mare

This is where we stayed and it was a good choice for us. It is the largest of the five towns and has the most hotel rooms, the best and biggest sandy beaches with easy access, including parking. We were able to drive our rental car down into the town since we had a confirmed hotel reservation and the hotel had a tiny car park garage a short walk away (see more info below on transportation).

Monterosso, Cinque Terre, Italy.

The beaches of Monterosso. The newer part of town is just in the distance.

There is a newer part of Monterosso (the north section, where our hotel was) and the older part (southern section) with more typical old world European ambience, separated from each other by a rocky point with a pedestrian tunnel (or you can hike up and around the point). Since we were only staying a couple nights the new section was fine for us and the hotel was very comfortable.

Monterosso, Cinque Terre, Italy

A view of the rocky point that separates old Monterosso (show here) from the newer town (behind the point). An old convent sits above the town.

Monterosso, Cinque Terre, Italy

Street scene in old town Monterosso.

Cinque Terre, Italy

A view along the trail between Monterosso and Vernazza. The hike took about 1.5 hours with lots of stops for photos (and to catch my breath). This is probably the most popular section of the trail between the towns. The trail had a lot of up and down sections, so be prepared to burn some calories. Please note that a Parco Nationale della Cinque Terre pass is required to hike the trail. Better to pay the €7 fee than to pay a fine if caught without the Pass. There is a little booth right by the trail a short distance south of Monterosso to get your ticket and there are probably other locations on the trail or in the towns too.

Vernazza

Perhaps the most scenic village (a very difficult call), with a little castle and tower overlooking the bay and the town center. Vernazza is probably the second most popular location for staying in the Cinque Terre.

Vernazza, Cinque Terre, Italy

A view of Vernazza from the trail leading north to Monterosso.

Vernazza, Cinque Terre, Italy

A view of the little beach in Vernazza.

Vernazza, Cinque Terre, Italy

A view of Vernazza from Castle Doria.

Cinque Terre Vernazza31

Inside the church in Vernazza, which dates from 1318.

Vernazza, Cinque Terre, Italy

An alleyway in Vernazza, with a cat checking things out!

Corniglia

We did not visit this town since it is more difficult to access (there is no boat connection) and my guess is for that reason it is the quietest of the five towns.

Corniglia, Cinque Terre, Italy

A view of Corniglia.

With more time, we would have hiked to the Corniglia from Vernazza. You can also hike to other locations from Corniglia via a higher trail that connects town above the Cinque Terre. Because it is a bit more remote, Corniglia attracts more backpacker tourists.

Manarola

The best views of Manarola are from the northern side of the tiny bay, from a little park that overlooks the town and bay (Punta Bonfiglio).

Manarola, Cinque Terre, Italy

A view of Manarola from Punta Bonfiglio.

Manarola, Cinque Terre, Italy

A view of Manarola from the upper town looking towards the harbor.

Manarola, Cinque Terre, Italy

Boats are parked like cars in Manarola.

I believe that the trail along the coast between Manarola and Corniglia is closed, as is the section between Manarola and Riomaggiore. This is a real bummer since the hike in both directions from Manarola would be pretty easy. The closures are due to slides and unsafe trail conditions. It is not clear when or if these trails will reopen.

Riomaggiore

Probably the third prettiest town after Vernazza, once again a very tough call. I thought the little harbor was so unique and scenic.

Riomaggiore, Cinque Terre, Italy

Riomaggiore, Cinque Terre, Italy

Another view of Riomaggiore from an upper street.

Riomaggiore, Cinque Terre, Italy

Stairway in Riomaggiore.

Some Practical Advice about Transportation
There are three ways to get from town to town: 1) a “hop on, hop off” type of boat service, which I heartily recommend; 2) train service, which is fast, crowded, somewhat pricey and less scenic; 3) taking a hike between the towns (note the trail closures mentioned above). Hiking a least one section of the trail should be on your list of “to-do’s”.

Cinque Terre Manarola0

A view of the passenger unloading process at Manarola.

Cars are worthless here. The roads are extremely narrow, steep and curvy down into the towns. There is almost no place to park, and you will probably be stopped on the road above each town, with the police telling you not to attempt the drive down. Check with your hotel or B&B beforehand on what to do if you are traveling by car. The boat service allowed us to “hop on and hop off” all day long, and provides great views of the coastline along the way. Keep in mind that the boat service will not be operational in the winter. Also, the boat does not stop at Corniglia since there is no dock access. Keep your boat ticket in a safe place! We used the train once from Vernazza back to Monterosso. It is busy and is the main transportation method between the five towns and into and out of the Cinque Terre. In some cases you’ll have to hike a bit from the train stations into the towns – there is only so much room. It must have been a huge job to build the train tracks through these rugged hills and coastline.

The boat service did provide a ‘bonus’ stop (probably my favorite place in this region) that I will discuss in my next Italy post!

 

Urbino — Birthplace of Raphael and Home of the Palazzo Ducale

From the Republic of San Marino we headed south and visited one other town in the afternoon before heading back to our home base in Ravenna, Italy. Urbino is about 45 km (28 miles) south of San Marino, via a winding country road that meanders through the hills and valleys of this beautiful region of Italy.

Urbino, Italy

View of Urbino from the west.

The main tourist sight in Urbino is the Palazzo Ducale, considered Italy’s most beautiful Renaissance Palace, built for Duke Federico da Montefeltro, ruler of Urbino from 1444-1482. One of Italy’s greatest Renaissance artists, Raphael, was born in Urbino in 1483, and thankfully he is represented in the Ducal Palace through some of his works as well as those of his talented father.

Ducal Palace, Urbino, Italy

It’s difficult to get an overall view of the Ducal Palace due to its location in the heart of Urbino.

The Palace is in the center of the hilltop medieval town of Urbino. It contains a number of priceless works of art, including paintings, tapestries and beautiful three dimensional inlaid wood panels.

Urbino Duomo, Urbino, Italy

Urbino’s Cathedral (Duomo) with the Ducal Palace visitor’s entrance on the left.

Ducal Palace, Urbino, Italy

The inlaid woodwork gives a 3D look to the walls of the Studiolo, the former study of the Duke. The artist Botticelli is said to have designed some of the images in this room.

Studiolo, Ducal Palace, Urbino, Italy

Another inlaid wood panel in the Studiolo.

Studiolo, Ducal Palace, Urbino, Italy

One more panel in the Studiolo. It feels like you can walk right through the porch and out into the landscape.

Angels' Room, Ducal Palace, Urbino, Italy

The Angels’ Room, one of 500 rooms in the Palace.

Ducal Palace, Urbino, Italy

A Great Hall in the Ducal Palace.

La Muta, Ducal Palace, Urbino, Italy

Raphael’s La Muta (or Portrait of a Gentlewoman), oil on wood, from about 1507. One of the great paintings housed in the Ducal Palace, and often compared to the Mona Lisa. Raphael died at the young age of 37, but left an amazing legacy of art in that short lifetime.

Ducal Palace, Urbino, Italy

The entire first floor of the Palace is filled with fine Renaissance art.

Cortile d'Onore, Ducal Palace, Urbino, Italy

Central Courtyard of the Ducal Palace (Cortile d’Onore).

In addition to the main rooms of the Palace, the basement level contains stables, kitchens and storage areas that are worth a look.

Ducal Palace basement, Urbino, Italy

Hallway leading through the basement of the Palace.

Ducal Palace, Urbino, Italy

This is a cistern-like ‘refrigerator’ in the basement of the Palace. Snow would be packed in here during the winter to keep stores fresh for months.

Ducal Palace, Urbino, Italy

Washing/kitchen area underneath the Ducal Palace.

Horse stables, Ducal Palace, Urbino, Italy

Horse stable area and storage facilities in the basement of the Palace.

Ducal Palace, Urbino, Italy

Toilet area near the stables. The servants would sleep in this area too!

The Ducal Palace was pretty quiet with just a few visitors roaming. Urbino is another Italian town that has few tourists in May. The town of 24,000 inhabitants, is largely made up of students at Urbino’s university, the primary ‘industry’ in town.

Urbino, Italy

Street scene, Urbino.

Urbino, Italy

One of the steep narrow streets in Urbino.

We enjoyed wandering the streets after visiting the Palace–be prepared to get some exercise!

Visiting “The Most Serene Republic of San Marino” – Europe’s 3rd Smallest Country

As a day trip from Ravenna, we drove south about 78 km (48 miles) to the hilltop Republic of San Marino. As we sped down the motorway, we could see the striking Monte  Titano in the distance and wondered if it was the little country of San Marino. Sure enough, it was, and what a sight. San Marino’s location is one of the most scenic spots in the Italian peninsula, and the country lives up to its formal name.

Mt. Titano, San Marino, Italy

A view of the Monte Titano and the fortifications of Guaita Castle as you approach from Borgomaggiore, the largest town in San Marino.

San Marino is the oldest Republic in Europe. It is only 7 miles (12 km) across at its widest spot (about 23 sq. miles overall), and the 3rd smallest country in Europe (after the Vatican and Monaco) and the 5th smallest country in the world. You can learn more about this little country here. Other than a bridge noting the border you would have no idea you’ve entered a different country.

San Marino0

The road border crossing. San Marino on the left, Italy on the right.

From the border on the eastern side, we drove up (and up) the mount until we reached a parking area right below the town of San Marino.

San Marino3

One of the car parks below the town of San Marino. We had no trouble finding a parking spot in May. You can also take a cable car to the top of Monte Titano.

From the car park we walked up into the town of San Marino, which like so many old walled European towns is very enchanting.

City Gate, San Marino, Italy

One of the old gates into the hilltop town of San Marino.

San Marino, Italy

Nearly every street in San Marino provides a postcard view.

San Marino, Italy

Another street scene in San Marino.

As you climb the narrow streets, you will come to Liberty Square, the main plaza in San Marino and the seat of the national government.

Public Palace, San Marino, Italy

A view of the Public Palace, home of San Marino’s General Council or Parliament, and other government officials. Under this square are ancient water cisterns, extremely important for a fortified hilltop medieval citadel.

One of the most striking features of San Marino is its amazing fortress, Guaita, that sits at the top of the town, on the eastern cliff edge of Monte Titano. The fortress consists of three towers, you can buy a ticket that allows you access to all three.

Guaita Fortress, San Marino, Italy

This view is from the 2nd tower of Guaita Fortress, looking north to the main or 1st tower, also called Rocca Tower.

Guaita Fortress, San Marino, Italy

This view is also from the 2nd tower, looking south to the 3rd tower on the next hilltop ridge. The surrounding countryside is beautiful in May.

Guaita Fortress, San Marino, Italy

This is a close up view of the 2nd tower of Guaita Fortress.

I have to say the view from the fortress of the surrounding countryside is one of the most beautiful views in Italy.

Guaita Fortress, San Marino, Italy

Climbing up to the Rocca tower from the 2nd tower.

Guita Fortress, San Marino, Italy

The main tower (known as Rocca Tower) of Guaita Fortress, is built on top of a narrow rock outcropping on Mt. Titano. You climb up a narrow steep stairway to get to the top.

Guaita Fortress, San Marino, Italy

The fortress grounds are well manicured.

San Marino, Italy

View of San Marino and the surrounding countryside from the top of the Rocca tower.

Guaita Fortress museum, San Marino, Italy

Inside Guaita Fortress is a small museum and a prison.

Guaita Fortress, San Marino, Italy

One of the prison cells in Guaita Fortress. The paintings were done by 19th century prisoners. Prisoners had to pay for their keep here, and punishments were harsh. The “rack” and lashings were commonly used. In 1821, San Marino abolished these forms of punishment. The death penalty was outlawed by San Marino’s Parliament in 1848.

San Marino takes its name from a monk, Saint Marinus, who fled persecution by the Roman Emperor Diocletian in the 3rd century CE and came to this (at the time) remote spot. The mountain (Monte Titano) was given to him in appreciation for his acts of healing. Saint Marinus died in 301 CE.

Mt. Titano, San Marino

This wooden stairway leads up to the little cave-like area where Saint Marinus lived. It is on the north side of Monte Titano.

Saint Marinus Cave, San Marino, Italy

The lovely view from Saint Marinus’ cave, looking northeast to the Adriatic Sea in the distance.

Basilica of Saint Marinus, San Marino, Italy

The 19th century Basilica of Saint Marinus, in the town of San Marino is built on the remains of a medieval church and contains an urn with the bones of Saint Marinus, which were found in the 1500’s.

If your travels take you down the east coast of Italy, be sure to visit San Marino. You can see a new country, take in incredible views, visit a great medieval fortress and town, all in one place!

A Tour of Ravenna–A Roman and Byzantine Marvel

From our stay in Ferrara (Italy) we moved on to Ravenna, about 87 km (54 miles) southeast, near the Adriatic Sea and not too far south of Venice. Ravenna has been on my bucket list for a long time. It has a glorious history as the capital of the western of Roman Empire between the fall of Rome (5th century CE) and the rise of Byzantine Empire in Constantinople (Istanbul). The main tourist sights are the beautiful early Christian mosaics found in the churches and baptistries from the 5th – 6th centuries, amazingly still intact. They are incredible!

Shown below are most of most main sights to see in Ravenna.

Basilica di San Vitale

This church is probably the most stunning of all the locations. The mosaics date from 526 – 547 CE, and look like they were finished yesterday.

Basilica di San Vitale, Ravenna, Italy.

Exterior of the Basilica di San Vitale, which may have been designed by someone from Constantinople.

San Vitale, Ravenna, Italy

The apse of San Vitale – perhaps the most stunning mosaics in all of Ravenna. One has to just stand there in awe and absorb all the detailed work that went into creating these murals.

Basilica di San Vitale, Ravenna, Italy

A close-up of the mosaics in San Vitale, showing stories from the Old Testament of Abel and Melchizedek making offerings.

Mausoleo di Galla Placidia

Right next to San Vitale is the Mausoleo di Galla Placidia. Despite its name, this structure became a private chapel rather than a tomb. The Mausoleo was begun in 430 CE.

Mausoleo di Galla Placidia, Ravenna, Italy

Exterior view of the Mausoleo di Galla Placidia.

Mausoleo di Galla Placidia, Ravenna, Italy

Interior view of the Mausoleo. The alabaster windows were an early 20th century gift from the King of Italy.

Mausoleo di Galla Placidia, Ravenna, Italy

One other view of the interior of the Mausoleo di Galla Placidia.

Battistero Neoniano (Neonian Baptistry)

This is Ravenna’s oldest monument, from the early part of the 5th century CE. It is located next to Ravenna’s Duomo (cathedral) and the very cool 10th century leaning bell tower.

Neonian Baptistry, Ravenna, Italy

The Neoniano Baptistry is on the right, the leaning 10th century bell tower is in the background and the Duomo on the left.

Battistero Neoniano, Ravenna, Italy

Interior of the Battistero Neoniano, showing the baptism of Jesus in the ceiling of the dome.

Ravenna Duomo, Ravenna, Italy

Although not part of the historical tour ticket, this is an interior view of Ravenna’s Duomo, located next to the Battistero Neoniano. The Duomo has been rebuilt over the centuries, the current structure dates from the 18th century.

Sant’ Apollinare Nuovo

This is a 6th century CE church, named for the first bishop of Ravenna, and it has a bit different feel to it than the other monuments above (rectangular, lighter and more open). It was constructed by Theodoric the Great, as his palace chapel. It is also included as part of the combination ticket. There are mosaics of scenes from Christ’s birth, his miracles and resurrection as well as representations of numerous saints and martyrs in this church.

Sant' Apollinare Nuovo, Ravenna, Italy

Exterior view of Sant’ Apollinare Nuovo church (6th century CE).

Sant' Apollinare Church, Ravenna, Italy

Interior view of Sant’ Apollinare Church. On the left lower panel is a procession of 22 virgins traveling towards the Madonna and Child (located near the apse).

Sant' Apollinare interior, Ravenna, Italy

This image captures part of the succession of martyrs (lower panel), opposite from the procession of the virgins. The structure to the right of the martyrs represents the Palace of Theodoric.

To visit the main sights above, go to the tourist office in the old town, and purchase a ticket (€11.50 at the time of our visit) and a map of the sights included.

ravenna-battistero-neoniano1

This sign, at one of the main sights, shows the places included in the combination ticket.

The streets are also pretty well marked, with arrows pointing and providing directions towards the main churches.

ravenna sant' apollinare nuovo4

Example of a street sign providing directions to the sights.

Keep in mind that you will be walking quite a bit, although the points of interest are not too far apart and can be easily visited in 2/3 of a day. During our visit in May, the sights were not crowded, there were no lines to enter any of the churches. However, later in the summer, it will likely be quite a bit busier, we saw ropes to handle long lines at least at a couple of the more popular locations.

In addition to the sights above, there are some other places you should see in Ravenna.

Battistero degli Ariani

I’m not sure why this little late-5th century CE baptistry is not part of the ticket above, but it’s worth taking a look. I think it cost €1 to visit. It is located a few blocks from Sant’ Apollinare Nuovo.

Battistero degli Ariani, Ravenna, Italy

Exterior of Battistero degli Ariani.

Battistero degli Ariani, Ravenna, Italy

The cupola of the Battistero degli Ariani, showing the Apostles ringed around baptism of Christ.

Basilica di San Francesco and Dante’s Tomb

The Italian poet Dante died in Ravenna in 1321, and his tomb is just to the side of the Basilica di San Francesco, which is also worth a visit for its flooded crypt.

Basilica di San Francesco, Ravenna, Italy

Exterior view of the Basilica of San Francesco. Dante’s tomb is on the left side, out of view of this photo. The church was built between the 9th and 10th centuries CE, and then underwent modifications a couple hundred years later.

Basilica San Francesco crypt, Ravenna, Italy

The flooded 10th century crypt (complete with gold fish) in the Basilica di San Francesco. You pay 1 euro to have the crypt illuminated. The marshy land and high water table in Ravenna has kept the crypt flooded for centuries.

Dante's tomb, Ravenna, Italy

Exterior of Dante’s tomb.

Dante's tomb, Ravenna, Italy

Interior of Dante’s tomb, he was 56 years old when he died.

San Giovanni Evangelista

This church, close to Sant’ Apollinare Nuovo was rebuilt over the centuries, and has some very interesting fragments of old mosaics along its aisles.

San Giovanni Evangelista, Ravenna, Italy

Interior of San Giovanni Evangelista, which looks similar to Sant’ Apollinare Nuovo.

San Giovanni Evangelista, Ravenna, Italy

Examples of the mosaic fragments in San Giovanni Evangelista.

Everywhere you turn in Ravenna, there is something interesting to see…

Ravenna, Italy

An old Roman building on a street corner in Ravenna.

The old town has a pleasant main square, with restaurants surrounding it.

Piazza del Popolo, Ravenna, Italy

Ravenna’s main square, Piazza del Popolo.

Ravenna, Italy

Ravenna street scene. In the afternoon, the streets are pretty quiet, until the residents come out for their evening stroll.

We stayed in a lovely B&B just south of the old town, perhaps a 1/3 mile walk to the center of the old town.

Torre Asinelli and Torre Garisenda, Bologna, Italy

Bologna – the Other Italian City with Leaning Towers

We all have heard about the leaning tower in Pisa, Italy, but have you heard of the leaning towers in Bologna? While these towers may be less famous, they are the signature feature of this beautiful city, which is located roughly halfway between Florence and Venice. Two of the most famous towers in Bologna are Torre Asinelli and Torre Garisenda, which are mere feet from each other. These towers were built in the 12th century by two important families, trying to outdo each other by the height of their towers, as a way of demonstrating their power and wealth.

Torri degli Asinelli e Garisenda, Bologna, Italy

The Asinelli and Garisenda towers. It is difficult to get a photo of these two towers given the proximity of all the surrounding buildings.

The tallest, Asinelli, can be climbed, but get your ticket in advance. We got ours on my phone while waiting in line, not knowing how busy it would be and we were lucky to get a ticket for an immediately available time. These towers are probably the busiest spot in Bologna from a tourist standpoint. Otherwise, Bologna is fairly quiet.

Asinelli Torre, Bologna, Italy

A view of the Asinelli Torre. As can be seen, it leans a bit to the left in this photo.

From the top, you get an amazing view of Bologna and look down on the Torre Garisenda, which had to be shortened by about 36 feet in the 14th century due to its significant lean.

Asinelli and Garisenda towers, Bologna, Italy

Looking down from the top of Asinelli tower towards the Garisenda tower.

Bologna, Italy

A view of Bologna’s skyline and a few other surviving towers from the top of Torre Asinelli. At one point there were 200 towers in Bologna, they must have been quite a sight.

Bologna, Italy

Another view from the top of Torre de Asinelli looking towards San Petronio Church, which can also be climbed for a great view of the leaning towers, shown below.

Torre Asinelli, Bologna, Italy

A view of some of the 500 steps descending from the top of Torre Asinelli.

Torre Asinelli and Torre Garisenda, Bologna, Italy

A view of the Torri degli Asinelli e Garisenda towers. Torre Garisenda (the shorter) leans 10 feet off of vertical. Torre Asinelli is 318 feet high and the fourth highest medieval tower in Italy.

In addition to the towers, there are lots of other fun sights to visit in Bologna. Several of these are described below.

San Petronio Basilica

This church, named after Saint Petronius, who was bishop of Bologna in the 5th century, was founded in 1390 and was originally intended to be larger than St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. Funding for the building was diverted for other purposes and the church was scaled down and never fully completed.

San Petronio, Bologna, Italy

Exterior view of San Petronio. The facade was never finished.

San Petronio Church, Bologna, Italy

The immense interior of San Petrino, with 22 chapels off the main aisle. A bit hard to see, but in the lower left of the photo is a meridian line, drawn by the astronomer Cassini in 1655, providing a precise solar method to determine a day of the year.

Piazza Maggiore, Bologna, Italy

Piazza Maggiore, next to the San Petronio Basilica.

Abbazia di Santo Stefano

A connected maze of four medieval churches, known as Abbazia di Santo Stefano, was one of my favorite sights in Bologna. There is a long history of churches on this site, originally dating back to about 80 CE. Over a thousand years, the site expanded with additional chapels and other structures.

Abbazia di Santo Stefano, Bologna, Italy

Exterior view of Abbazia di Santo Stefano, located just a short walk from the leaning towers.

Abbazia di Santo Stefano, Bologna, Italy

The 11th century church of the Crocifisso, part of the Abbazia di Santo Stefano complex.

San Sepolcro, Abbazia di Santo Stefano, Bologna, Italy

San Sepolcro, containing the tomb of Saint Petronius, is polygonal in shape, not unlike the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem.

Abbazia di Santo Stefano, Bologna, Italy

One of the courtyards in Abbazia di Santo Stefano. Note the intricate brick design on the exterior of the San Sepolcro.

Fontana di Pilato, Abbazia di Santo Stefano, Bologna, Italy

The Fontana di Pilato in another courtyard of Abbazia di Santo Stefano, with a basin from the 8th century.

Bologna University

Bologna is home to the oldest university in continuous operation in Europe, founded in 1088. A few rooms are open to the public and a couple of these are shown below.

Anatomy Theater, Bologna University, Bologna, Italy

This is the Anatomy Theater, the cadaver would lie on the table shown for dissection and study by students in the surrounding galleries.

Anatomy Theater, Bologna University, Bologna, Italy

The “3-D” ceiling of the Anatomy Theater at Bologna University.

Stabat Mater Hall, Bologna University, Bologna, Italy

Stabat Mater Hall, a former reading room for law students.

San Giacomo Maggiore Church

Another beautiful church, not too far from the towers is the 13th century San Giacomo Maggiore Church. The Bentivoglio family chapel within, consecrated in 1486, has famous 15th century frescoes.

San Giacomo Maggiore Church, Bologna, Italy

Exterior of the San Giacomo Maggiore church, with its porticoed walkway on the left side, so common in Bologna.

San Giacomo Maggiore Church, Bologna, Italy

The interior of the San Giacomo Maggiore church. The church contains numerous famous works of art.

Bentivoglio chapel, San Giacomo Maggiore Church, Bologna, Italy

A view of the Bentivoglio family chapel, with the famous “Triumph of Death” fresco by Lorenzo Costa (1483).

Bologna is a great city to visit with a lot to interest the tourist, and yet it receives far fewer visitors than its more famous neighbors to the north and south respectively, Venice and Florence. If you want to stay in a smaller city, Bologna can be done as a day trip from Ferrara, about 52 km (32 miles) to the north.

Bologna, Italy

Street scene in Bologna, with the 13th century Palazzo del Podesta at the end of the street.

Neptune's Fountain, Bologna, Italy

Neptune’s Fountain, (1566), another famous landmark in Bologna.

 

Ferrara, A Non-Touristy Gem in Italy

Located in northern Italy only 112 km (70 miles) south of Venice or 108 km southeast of Verona is the “undiscovered gem” of Ferrara. This town isn’t really on the tourist map and is one of those places I love finding and exploring. The vibe in Ferrara felt “authentic”, with just a handful of tourists and primarily locals going about their daily business. It is a compact old city, easy to explore in one day.

Ferrara, Italy

A view of central Ferrara from a tower of Estense Castle.

The two main sights in Ferrara are Estense Castle and the Duomo, both adjacent to the main piazza (town square). In addition to these sights, we enjoyed wandering the back alleys, which felt like they had not changed much in a few hundred years.

Estense Castle

Ferrara is home to one of the great castles in Italy, right in the heart of the town.

Estense Castle, Ferrara, Italy

Street view of Estense Castle.

The castle was constructed in 1385, and although it has undergone many remodels since, it has the classic features that one would expect in a medieval castle–moat, dungeons, kitchens, halls and courtyards.

Estense Castle, Ferrara, Italy

Moat around Estense Castle.

Estense Castle, Ferrara, Italy

One of the castle’s halls. The mirrors on the main floor allow the visitor to get a closer look at the marvelous ceiling paintings.

Estense Castle, Ferrara, Italy

Stone cannon balls in the castle courtyard.

Estense Castle, Ferrara, Italy

Entrance to one of the dungeons in Estense Castle.

Estense Castle, Ferrara, Italy

Prisoner graffiti in one of the castle’s dungeons. One prisoner spent 43 years here, and when he left he was proudly wearing clothes that were 43 years out of fashion!

Estense Castle, Ferrara, Italy

The castle’s kitchen, with room for the fires below and the big pots above on the counter.

Estense Castle, Ferrara, Italy

Two levels of dungeon doors, you didn’t want to get on the bad side of the d’Este family!

Estense Castle, Ferrara, Italy

Another view of the castle, with draw bridges – a difficult place to attack!

The d’Este family, who ruled Ferrara hundreds of years, built this castle and imprisoned their political enemies here. There were also at least two executions.

ferrara estense castle11

Illustrated bible of the d’Este family. The family, although ruthless, was a great patron of the arts.

Ferrara Duomo (Cathedral)
Unfortunately the 12th century Duomo exterior and interior were undergoing restoration work during our visit, but we were still able to see the interior.

Ferrara Duomo, Ferrara, Italy

Interior view of the Ferrara Duomo.

Ferrara Duomo, Ferrara, Italy

One of the chapels in the Duomo.

ferrara cathedral 3

Interesting display in the Duomo. Note the diversity of figures all working together on restoring the church.

The facade of the Duomo is one of the great architectural achievements of early renaissance Italy and I wish it would have been visible! Look it up.

Piazza Municipale and Surrounding Area

This is the central town square and like most in Italy, it is beautiful, with the Duomo on one side and the Palazzo del Commune (palace) on another side.

Piazza Municipale, Ferrara, Italy

Piazza Municipale, Ferrara. The Duomo is on the right. The Palazzo del Comune is straight ahead. Note the old medieval shops nestled right next to the Duomo.

Ferrara, Italy

A shopping street in Ferrara.

Ferrara, Italy.

One of many quiet alleyways in Ferrara.

Ferrara, Italy

Ferrara has an interesting feel to it, with the quiet cobblestone streets and old brick buildings.

Practical Matters

We stayed in a 15th century apartment (Nel cuore di Ferrara, you can find it on various accommodation booking sites), located about 5-10 minutes walking from the main piazza. What a quaint setting it was, in an old house with an enclosed courtyard and exposed ancient wood beams.

ferrara apartmentjpg

Our apartment in Ferrara.

ferrara famous bread

This bread is a trademark of Ferrara, but we didn’t find it all that great, kind of dry, more like a cracker!

Ferrara, Italy

Another delicious Italian meal in Ferrara!

Like many Italian cities, Ferrara has a ZTL (zone of limited traffic) which means that you must park outside the city walls and walk to the center of town (only 10-15 minutes). I am glad Italy has created the ZTL’s, they remove noise, pollution and traffic from the city centers. But be careful, unless you have a pass, you will get a steep fine if you drive in the ZTL area.

We made Ferrara our home base for a couple of days, visiting Bologna (only 50 km or 31 miles) from here, which also is not overrun with tourists – this will be my next post. We like staying in smaller towns which are easy to get in and out of. Ferrara is also close to Modena, home of Ferrari’s and Maserati’s, if you’re an Italian car enthusiast.

Padova – Home of the Scrovegni Chapel and Other Treasures

With Verona, Italy as a home base, we drove to Padua (also spelled Padova), which is 82 km or 51 miles from Verona or 40 km (25 miles) from Venice (which is another option for a home base).

Padova General

A view of the more modern part of Padua, with its exclusive shops.

The town of Padua is home to a few world-class sights, one of the most famous being the Scrovegni Chapel.

Scrovegni Chapel

This private Chapel of the Scrovegni family (the only structure remaining of the 13th century family palace) is one of the great historical gems of Europe. The family hired Giotto to paint the interior between 1303 – 1305, and he, with his assistants created a masterpiece. (The featured image of this post shows the Scrovegni Chapel altar alcove).

Scrovegni Chapel

A view of the interior of the Scrovegni Chapel. The far end of the Chapel contains scenes from the Last Judgment.

Scrovegni Chapel, Padova, Italy

A few of the panels showing scenes from the New Testament.

Scrovegni Chapel, Padua, Italy

A close-up of the betrayal of Christ scene.

We are fortunate that the Chapel is still standing to this day. The paintings represented a breakthrough for their time with the use of color and perspective (3-D-like). Within the Chapel’s walls are numerous biblical scenes, in chronological order. To allow for preservation of these 700 year-old frescoes, there are significant restrictions on the number of visitors allowed each day, so you need to plan ahead.

Note: You must purchase your tickets in advance. Once you know your itinerary, go to this website to purchase your tickets, which you then print and bring with you to the visitors center. You must arrive early enough to go through the dehumidifying chamber that helps protect the Chapel’s environment and frescoes.

Padova Scrovegni Chapel and Museum33

The dehumidifying room next to the Scrovegni Chapel. They show a video of the history of the Chapel while you wait (about 15 minutes).

During the busy summer months, I am sure tours book quickly (we visited in May, and I made our reservations in March). As I recall, you are allowed about 15 minutes for your visit, in groups of 25 or so. Pictures are allowed without flash. The Chapel is on the outskirts of the old center of Padua, and you can walk to the center of the old town in about 10 minutes. We used a car park just two blocks from the Chapel, not far from the train station.

Other Sights in Padova

Adjacent to the Scrovegni Chapel is the 13th century Church of the Eremitani, definitely worth a stop even though it’s largely ignored by tourists. This church reminded me of ancient Roman basilicas, with its austere rectangular shape.

Church of the Eremitani, Padua, Italy

Interior of the Church of the Eremitani. It has an unusual “boat like” wooden 14th century ceiling and remnants of frescoes, which were unfortunately damaged in World War II.

Padova Chiesa Eremitani 7

Some of the surviving frescoes in the Chiesa Eremitani.

Padova University

We lucked out and were just in time to take a tour of one of the oldest and most famous universities in Europe, founded in 1222. The university is in the heart of the old town. Tours are the only way to see the university’s primary historical sights including Galileo’s pulpit and lecture hall (he was on the faculty here for 18 years) and the anatomy theater. Unfortunately no photos are allowed inside.

Padova University2

Coats of Arms of some of the alumni of Padua University.

Padova University, Padova, Italy

Within this building are the anatomy theater and the hall where Galileo taught, with his original podium. Hard to get a decent photo of the University – it’s completely surrounded by other buildings.

The anatomy theater, where students would stand in narrow concentric rows above a cadaver table is small, and you are only allowed to view up into the theater from below the cadaver’s point of view. The theater was built in 1594 and is the oldest surviving medical lecture theater in the world.

Théâtre-anatomique-Padoue

This photo, courtesy of Wikipedia, provides a view of the anatomy theater in Padua University. The tourist is only allowed a view up through the center of the main floor table area.

Duomo (Cathedral) Baptistery

The 13th century baptistery is beautiful, and should be a definite stop on your visit to Padua. The frescoes date from 1378. The good news is that although an entrance fee is required, a visit is not time restricted, nor are reservations needed.

Padua Duomo and Baptistery, Padua, Italy

An exterior view of Padua’s Cathedral, the baptistery is the circular building on the right.

Interior of Padua's Duomo Baptistery

A view inside Padua’s Duomo baptistery.

Padua Duomo Baptistery.

A view of the dome of the baptistery. How hard would it be to paint this ceiling and keep any perspective!

Padua’s Palazzos and Piazzas

One of Padua’s main piazzas (Piazza delle Erbe) features a large, magnificent 13th century hall adjacent to the piazza. This building is used for various art exhibits. The entry fees are fairly expensive, so we did not go inside.

Palazzo della Ragione, Padua, Italy

A view of the Palazzo della Ragione, a 13th century great hall that housed medieval law courts, located in the center of Padua.

Plazzo del Capitanio, Padua, Italy

The Palazzo del Capitanio is located on Piazza dei Signori. It was built between 1599 and 1605, for the head of the city’s militia. A large astronomical clock is located on the front tower.

Vincenza

On our way back to Verona, we stopped briefly in Vincenza, a town that would be worth exploring a bit more. This city is known for its great architecture. We saw students studying and drawing several buildings. We walked around for about an hour before returning to Verona.

Vincenza, Italy

Vincenza’s southern gated entrance.

Vincenza, Piazza dei Signori, Italy

Vincenza’s main piazza, Piazza dei Signori. The tower, Torre di Piazza, was built in the 12th century (my wide angle lens makes it look like it’s leaning, but in reality it’s still standing straight up!).

Vincenza Duomo, Vincenza, Italy

Vincenza’s Duomo (Cathedral).