What to see in Tikal Guatemala

Images of Tikal National Park, Guatemala

In my previous post on Tikal, I explained the important details to help ensure a successful visit. In this post, I’ll share images of the beautiful ruins. The order of images below is in the approximate order of our visit over about 7 1/2 hours in one day. Tikal is a large park and it will take a full day to see most of the ruins. The ancient city covered about 25 square miles and only about 15% has been excavated, meaning there is far more out there than meets the eye.

Map of Tikal, Guatemala

Map of Tikal National Park, showing the proximity of the major sights to one another. You can reference this map with the images below for an idea of the layout and structures in the Park.

Gran Plaza

This is the focal point of a visit to Tikal, and the “postcard” view spot. You can climb up Temple II, for a view of Temple I and the Plaza, as shown below.

Gran Plaza, Acropolis Norte, Temple 1, Tikal, Guatemala

Gran Plaza, Acropolis Norte to the left, Temple 1 (Gran Jaguar) on the right.

Temple 1 (Gran Jaguar), Gran Plaza

Temple 1 (Gran Jaguar), Gran Plaza, in the early morning mist.

Temple II, Gran Plaza, from Acropolis Norte.

A framed view of Temple II, Gran Plaza, from Acropolis Norte. This temple can be climbed from a stairway on the back side.

Acropolis Central, Gran Plaza, Tikal, Guatemala

Acropolis Central. This acropolis is on the south side of the Gran Plaza.

Temple III

Hidden behind Temple II just to the west of the Gran Plaza is Temple III. It is hard to see it through the trees, you’re looking straight up trying to find it! Most of this temple is still covered with jungle foliage.

Temple III, Tikal, Guatemala

Temple III, just behind Temple II. Most of Temple III is unexcavated, making a photo difficult. It dates from 810 CE.

Plaza de los Siete Templos

This site is at the southwest side of the Park, and was very quiet during our visit. While the structures may be a bit less grand here, it was a fun area to explore with no other tourists in sight. This site gets its name from seven small temples at one end of the plaza. There are 3 ball courts here, which is unique in Mayan archeological sites.

Plaza de lost Siete Templos, Tikal, Guatemala

Plaza de los Siete Templos is a bit off the beaten path.

Plaza de los Siete Templos, Tikal, Guatemala

One of the structures in Plaza de los Siete Templos, in its more natural ruined state.

Mundo Perdido

Also tucked away in the southwest corner of the Park is Mundo Perdido, or “Lost Word”. It kind of feels like that. This was one of my favorite locations in Tikal, partially due to the remote setting with the huge temples and the views from the top of the Great Pyramid.

Great Pyramid, Mundo Perdido, Tikal, Guatemala

This structure, called the Great Pyramid, is the oldest in Tikal and is part of a complex called Mundo Perdido (Lost World). Great views from the top!

Tikal, Guatemala

View from the top of the Great Pyramid, Mundo Perdido. On the right are the tops of Temples I and II (the Gran Plaza), on the left is the top of Temple III.

Sloping Panel Temple, Tikal, Guatemala

This is the Sloping Panel Temple, also part of Mundo Perdido (Lost World).

Palacio de las Ventanas (Palace of the Windows)

Another spot a bit off the beaten path. If you like bats, you’ll find them here. This structure is between Mundo Perdido and Temple IV. You can climb into the structure, at least there were no signs indicating this wasn’t allowed.

Palacio de las Ventanas, Tikal, Guatemala

A bit of a hike up to the Palacio de las Ventanas – somewhat steep and slick.

Palacio de las Ventanas, Tikal, Guatemala

Another view of Palacio de las Ventanas.

Temple IV

Temple IV is at the far west end of the Park. You can climb it (via a wooden stairway) for a view of the surrounding structures in the Park.

Temple IV, Tikal, Guatemala

This is Temple IV, it is extremely difficult to get a picture of, due to thick jungle growth all around it. It is the tallest temple in Tikal at 70 meters (230 ft).

North Zone, Complex “P”

We visited Complex “P” after Temple IV. It was a 20-25 minute walk. This complex is on the northern edge of the Park, and once again it was very quiet, I think we were the only tourists out here at the time.

North Zone, Complex "P", Tikal, Guatemala

These temples are part of the North Zone, Complex “P”.

North Zone, Complex P, Tikal, Guatemala

Another view of Complex “P” in the North Zone.

North Zone, Complex "Q", Tikal, Guatemala

Also part of the North Zone, Complex “Q”. Complex Q is closer to the Gran Plaza and therefore had more visitors. Note the stelae in front of the structures (the upright stones and circular altars) – their function is unclear, but they might have been used in worship rituals or commemorating various important events. Note: the map I have names these structures “Complex O” but the sign in the Park called these “Complex Q”).

Temple V

Temple V is on the south side of the Gran Plaza in its own little corner. On the signpost at this temple, it shows some photos of the excavation process – what a lot of work!

Temple V, Tikal, Guatemala

This is Temple V, it is 57 meters (187 feet) high, and dates from 650 CE.

Plaza Este y Mercado

Plaza Este y Mercado, Tikal, Guatemala

The Plaza Este y Mercado is located just to the southeast of the Gran Plaza. As its name implies, this must have been a commercial or shopping area.

Palacio de las Acanaladuras

Palacio de las Acanaladuras, Tikal, Guatemala

The Palacio de las Acanaladuras was a residential area. It is located about halfway from the Gran Plaza to Temple VI

Temple VI

Probably the most remote ruin in the Tikal visitor circuit, it’s a good temple to see on your way out, since it’s at the southeast end of the Park, and from here it’s a straight shot back to the main entrance.

Temple VI, Tikal, Guatemala

This is the back side of Temple VI. Although very hard to see, there are hieroglyphs on the upper part of this side, the most extensive amount found in Tikal to-date.

Temple VI, Tikal, Guatemala

Front view of Temple VI, very hard to get a good photo of this temple also.

As shown above, there’s lots to see in Tikal. Plan for a full day, put on some comfortable shoes and have fun exploring this magnificent Mayan site, one of the grandest and largest in Central America.